Monthly Archives: November 2013

Black footed cat Beauty gives birth!

Black footed cat Beauty gave birth to 2 kittens. Yesterday one was born alive and sadly a second one today probably was still born. As Beauty still was in labour the whole day (night) yesterday she wasn’t interested to… take care of her kitten. As it was lying far from the mom the whole day, and it was getting dark and windy, we as the SCC team decided to try and have the kitten drink with a domestic cat who had a litter recently. We are grateful to Maxie and Richard from the SCC/DCP team who are extremely dedicated to save the little bfc kitten (first born wild cat at SCC) and had to wake up every 2 hours to have the kitten drink with the mothercat and so far so good. Now we are deciding whether it will be a good idea to try and have the kitten reunited with Beauty again. Not sure yet if a 3rd kitten we still come, but it maybe is worth a try. For now it is most important that the kitten gains strength. The Black Footed Cat is an endangered species, the smalles wild cat of South Africa (and second smallest of the world). Let’s hope and pray this cutie will pull through

DNA tests have revealed a new small wild cat species!

As a family, cats are some of the most well-studied animals on Earth, but that doesn’t mean these adept carnivores don’t continue to surprise us. Scientists have announced today the stunning discovery of a new species of cat, long-confused with another. Looking at the molecular data of small cats in Brazil, researchers found that the tigrina—also known as the oncilla in Central America—is actually two separate species. Read more

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Javan Leopard release program

The Javan leopard is an endemic species to Java and at present classified as critical endangered species on IUCN Red List. Categorized under Appendix I CITES.

The Population estimates are not certain, but certainly less than 250 mature individuals, possibly even less than 100 (IUCN Red List).

That the Javan Leopard is endangered is a result of pet trade, hunting, habitat loss and fragmentation but also a decline of prey makes that the Javan leopards enter villages to find food, which causes leopard-human conflict.

While research has shown the important role of leopards in the ecosystem and biodiversity in the rainforest and their role as top predators, the public in Java is not educated in this. Their lack of knowledge means they perceive the Javan Leopard as a threat and a risk to their wellbeing.

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