Monthly Archives: March 2017

March 2017 – Official start of the WCW Pallas Cat Conservation Project

The official start of the WCW Pallas Cat Conservation Project is a fact now, since the contract with Zoo Lyon have been signed, in order for us to concentrate on in-situ and ex-situ conservation, like with all other projects, or to start with be a support on many levels to the wild Pallas cat, with great help from captive ambassadors (of Zoo Lyon) for which we also like to realise much more natural space. Our contactperson for this new project is Berengere Desmet, and it is a great add to the Wild Cats World projects world-wide again!!!!  Soon a special page will be dedicated to this new project and our new “collegue” dedicating herself to this brandnew challenge and project.

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In-situ and Ex-situ Conservation…………..,

Education, Raising awareness….is one of the most essential projects WCW is keeping very busy with, and is very much focused on. Very essential indeed, as while the full focus seems to be on lions, cheetah and cuddlefarms these days, the leopard species is disappearing so fast in lots of areas, being in much more danger than everybody was thinking.
Of course we also keep communicating and collecting stories and data on ground level, like from the farmers in South Africa, the fenced private areas and the hunting farms.
No surprise to confirm ridiculously numbers of predators are killed on a daily basis. Also predators but also prey animals are being captured, and kept in a captive situation for economical reasons.
Every now and then very touching stories are shared with us, like this one of our respected follower Susanne Kruger, who’s dad was a farmer in South Africa and lived close to the leopard peacefully. Here’s her story, like there could be many more, if people, and esp. farmers and hunters change their attitude and opinion.
“my parents lived on a plot which had 10 cottages and farmers all around in a mountainous area in Lydenburg. Every so often a male leopard traversed the area. My dad had hiked the mountains and then saw this leopard few times and also found its spoor. There were sheep on the plot, chickens and cattle on the farms. Only we knew of the leopard’s existence (pronounced as: it didn’t prey on farm animals!!!) The day after my dad passed, this leopard sat few meters from the fence, as if to say good-bye, and disappeared into the bush. ♡♡♡♡♡ Leopards don’t just attack humans for no reason”.
SAVE THE INCREDIBLE LEOPARD
(pictures: Bahati & Bella, daughters of Feline & Felipe, growing up beautifully with their parents, amongst our other dear leopards!)

Critical leopard situation in the (Eastern) Cape Region

The focus of our project in South Africa at this moment is our co-operation with three incredible Private Game Reserves (names mentioned at final stage) in the Eastern Cape, to have our leopard youngsters (Solo, Olive and later Bahati & Bella) released. The Reserves are very interested in leopards from our bloodlines and our ultimate mission is to have them released, and live wild and free roaming.

Of course as always the only obstruction, or delay, is by applying for the permits, or better: to have the forest dept. grant the permits.

While the leopards in certain parts of South Africa, like the Free State, are doing well in some National Parks and Private Game Reserves, the leopardpopulation in the Eastern Cape is almost extinct, and now also confirmed that even the Cape Leopard Population near Cederberg/Capetown, is having far more dramatic numbers than first was claimed.

While in the (Eastern) Cape not just the Cape Leopard is roaming freely, of course also the common African Leopard does have a place in this area, like in the whole of Africa, if people let them.

Nature Conservation is reluctant to grant permits for a release of common African Leopards in the Eastern Cape, for some not-valid reason, claiming “just” the Cape Leopard is living in this area of South Africa.

Of course we, and the managment of the Private game Reserves, don’t take no for an answer, and are working hard behind the scenes to collect info, to hand in motivation letters along with the application for the permits.

 

Maybe a good idea for all to read the following article, confirming how dramatically the numbers have declined in the Cape, and that is almost impossible to collect data, and to sight leopards in this area. Like we are saying all the time: leopard conservation, in-situ and ex-situ, is most essential at this moment. So the person basically saying “NO” to a release in the foremost Private Game Reserves in the Eastern Cape, will in fact be responsible to the leopard getting extinct in this area. Do they want to be responsible for this?

 

 

http://wildlifeact.com/blog/drakensberg-leopard-survey-preliminary-report/

 

“…….the complete absence of leopards is concerning. In total the survey effort was 2 334 days – substantially higher than the average survey effort in KZN of 1 692 days*. While this may not have been a sufficient period to obtain enough leopard pictures to generate a population density estimate, we would have expected to obtain some leopard pictures. Camera trap surveys in the mountainous regions of the Western Cape where leopard densities are similarly low (1 leopard per 100km2) have typically recorded at least 1 photo per 100 days of camera trapping.

*This is calculated by multiplying the number of camera trap sites / stations by the number of days spent in the field.

For example, studies in the Cederberg Mountains and Little Karoo both recorded leopards at a rate of approximately 0.012 leopard captures per day (Martins 2010, Mann 2014). A similar capture rate in the Drakensberg would have yielded around 27 leopard captures during this survey. While this is a coarse measure, it does show that leopard capture rates in the Drakensberg are much lower than have been recorded in other, reasonably analogous areas.

While it would be premature to suggest that leopards are absent from the southern Drakensberg, these results confirm a more general trend of extremely low leopard numbers in marginal habitat areas. This is of concern as these areas are generally considered to support extant leopard populations and account for a significant proportion of leopard habitat in South Africa (Swanepoel et al. 2013).

The results of this Drakensberg leopard survey suggest that, while leopards may persist in the Drakensberg, their numbers are possibly too low to constitute a functioning population. While monitoring leopard populations in mountainous areas is difficult and time-consuming, these are important refugia and habitat links in the context of the broader South African leopard population. We recommend further research to establish whether leopards are still extant in the southern Drakensberg, as well as to identify possible management interventions that could allow for population recovery.”

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Featured Ambassador

Featured Project

Black footed cats convervation project

WCW started this conservation project on the DCP farm in Spotted Cats Conservation, with three wild black-footed cats, Beauty, Blacky and Footy. All three cats were injured by traps and could not be released into the wild. They were given a great home as well as the necessary treatment by the vet.
In late 2013 we decided to relocate the cats to the Cat Conservation Trust (CCT) as part of a new working alliance that adds more knowledge and expertise to make the project even more successful. Also, our captive born female Diva could join Blacky & Beauty as a start of a breeding program with this very endangered species.

Black footed cats convervation project/">More....

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